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Syria’s Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian Refugees Grappling with Dire Conditions

Published : 22-05-2019

Syria’s Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian Refugees Grappling with Dire Conditions

After eight years of conflict, Palestine refugees, particularly those taking shelter in Yarmouk, continue to be one of the most vulnerable groups in Syria with immense humanitarian needs.

Palestinian families taking refuge in Yarmouk Camp continue to launch cries for help over their exacerbated situation due to the price hike, high unemployment rates, steep rental fees, and the decline in civilians’ purchasing power.

The unabated warfare has had disastrous fallouts on Palestinian refugee camps across the Syrian territories. Palestinians who remained in Yarmouk or returned to the camp sometime later have been struggling for survival, in an area that has been severely affected by the deadly hostilities.

Over recent years, most of Yarmouk’s families have lived on aids handed over to them by UNRWA.

Civilians continue to appeal to the concerned authorities to speed up reconstruction works and rehabilitate infrastructure and vital facilities, including water and power networks.

Thousands of Palestinian refugees were forced out of Yarmouk Camp after the Syrian fighter jets struck the area in late 2012. Dozens were killed and hundreds wounded in the onslaught. The situation went downhill after ISIS militias grabbed hold of the camp in April 2015 and closed off vital thoroughfares to the area. Scores of other stranded families fled the camp following the 33-day military operation launched by the government forces on April 19.

A few months earlier, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) published the results of an assessment of the damage to Syrian cities caused by seven years of relentless bombardment by the incumbent regime and its allies since 2011.

The analysis found out that as many as 5,489 buildings were destroyed in Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian refugees. The damage atlas used satellite-detected damage analysis to identify buildings that are either destroyed, or severely or moderately damaged. 

Short URL : http://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/8654

After eight years of conflict, Palestine refugees, particularly those taking shelter in Yarmouk, continue to be one of the most vulnerable groups in Syria with immense humanitarian needs.

Palestinian families taking refuge in Yarmouk Camp continue to launch cries for help over their exacerbated situation due to the price hike, high unemployment rates, steep rental fees, and the decline in civilians’ purchasing power.

The unabated warfare has had disastrous fallouts on Palestinian refugee camps across the Syrian territories. Palestinians who remained in Yarmouk or returned to the camp sometime later have been struggling for survival, in an area that has been severely affected by the deadly hostilities.

Over recent years, most of Yarmouk’s families have lived on aids handed over to them by UNRWA.

Civilians continue to appeal to the concerned authorities to speed up reconstruction works and rehabilitate infrastructure and vital facilities, including water and power networks.

Thousands of Palestinian refugees were forced out of Yarmouk Camp after the Syrian fighter jets struck the area in late 2012. Dozens were killed and hundreds wounded in the onslaught. The situation went downhill after ISIS militias grabbed hold of the camp in April 2015 and closed off vital thoroughfares to the area. Scores of other stranded families fled the camp following the 33-day military operation launched by the government forces on April 19.

A few months earlier, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) published the results of an assessment of the damage to Syrian cities caused by seven years of relentless bombardment by the incumbent regime and its allies since 2011.

The analysis found out that as many as 5,489 buildings were destroyed in Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian refugees. The damage atlas used satellite-detected damage analysis to identify buildings that are either destroyed, or severely or moderately damaged. 

Short URL : http://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/8654