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Jaramana Camp for Palestinian Refugees Grappling with Abject Conditions

Published : 23-07-2020

Jaramana Camp for Palestinian Refugees Grappling with Abject Conditions

Residents of Jaramana Camp have launched cries for help over the dire socio-economic conditions and simmering security turmoil rocking the area. 

High unemployment rates, poor infrastructure, steep rental fees, and chronic water crisis have made survival difficult for the majority of families.

The residents have gone traumatized by the chronic Israeli strikes targeting government military sites in and around the area. Abductions have also been increasingly reported by the camp residents.

The situation has been exacerbated by the sanctions implemented by the US as part of the so-called “Caesar Act” targeting anyone doing business with the Assad regime, including in opposition-held zones.

The implementation of the sanctions has led to a further deterioration of the exchange rate of the Syrian pound, resulting in a worse economic situation for vulnerable families whose sole sources of income have been already affected by the bloody warfare.

Nine years into the deadly conflict, the majority of Palestinian refugees continue to live below the poverty line in Syria and are food insecure.

Jaramana camp is 8km from Damascus on the road to Damascus International Airport. The camp was established in 1948.

Before the start of the conflict in 2011, there were over 18,000 Palestine refugees living in Jaramana camp. 

During the Syrian crisis, the number of Palestine refugees in the camp and the surrounding area increased to 49,000 due to an influx of displaced Palestine refugees from other areas, including the camp of Yarmouk.  As a result, Jaramana has become one of the most densely populated areas of Damascus. Many Palestine refugees took refuge in Jaramana because of the low rent rates.

The camp occupies an area of 0.03 square kilometres.  Historically, the camp has been inhabited by those displaced by the conflict in 1948, as well as Palestinians who had taken refuge in the Golan Heights and were displaced as a result of the 1967 hostilities.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/10415

Residents of Jaramana Camp have launched cries for help over the dire socio-economic conditions and simmering security turmoil rocking the area. 

High unemployment rates, poor infrastructure, steep rental fees, and chronic water crisis have made survival difficult for the majority of families.

The residents have gone traumatized by the chronic Israeli strikes targeting government military sites in and around the area. Abductions have also been increasingly reported by the camp residents.

The situation has been exacerbated by the sanctions implemented by the US as part of the so-called “Caesar Act” targeting anyone doing business with the Assad regime, including in opposition-held zones.

The implementation of the sanctions has led to a further deterioration of the exchange rate of the Syrian pound, resulting in a worse economic situation for vulnerable families whose sole sources of income have been already affected by the bloody warfare.

Nine years into the deadly conflict, the majority of Palestinian refugees continue to live below the poverty line in Syria and are food insecure.

Jaramana camp is 8km from Damascus on the road to Damascus International Airport. The camp was established in 1948.

Before the start of the conflict in 2011, there were over 18,000 Palestine refugees living in Jaramana camp. 

During the Syrian crisis, the number of Palestine refugees in the camp and the surrounding area increased to 49,000 due to an influx of displaced Palestine refugees from other areas, including the camp of Yarmouk.  As a result, Jaramana has become one of the most densely populated areas of Damascus. Many Palestine refugees took refuge in Jaramana because of the low rent rates.

The camp occupies an area of 0.03 square kilometres.  Historically, the camp has been inhabited by those displaced by the conflict in 1948, as well as Palestinians who had taken refuge in the Golan Heights and were displaced as a result of the 1967 hostilities.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/10415