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Water Network Repair Works Ongoing in Handarat Camp for Palestinian Refugees

Published : 15-10-2020

Water Network Repair Works Ongoing in Handarat Camp for Palestinian Refugees

Works have been in progress to repair water pumps in Handarat camp for Palestinian refugees, in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo.

Local residents told AGPS that equipment, including power generators, has been installed as part of underway efforts to rehabilitate the infrastructure. 

Water pumps feeding the main tank will be reportedly operative in the next few days.

Palestinian refugees have been grappling with dire conditions in Handarat due to the lack of humanitarian assistance and life-saving services. The majority of families have been taking shelter in buildings rented at extremely steep costs in the poverty-stricken area. A severe water and power crisis also continues to rock the camp.

Heavy shelling on Handarat and bloody shootouts between the government forces and the opposition outfits led to the destruction of over 90% of buildings in the camp. The confrontations culminated in the government’s takeover of the camp along with other zones in Aleppo and the displacement of its residents on April 27, 2013.

UN data indicates that Handarat camp (also known as Ein El-Tal camp) is on a hillside 13km north-east of the city of Aleppo in the Syrian Arab Republic. The camp was established in 1962 on an area of 0.16 square kilometers. Most of the inhabitants are refugees who fled from northern Palestine.

Ein El Tal camp was once home to around 7,000 residents. Around three hundred families moved to newly constructed houses in Ein El-Tal from Neirab camp under a 2003 project to reduce overcrowding in Neirab.

In April 2013, armed groups entered Ein El-Tal camp, forcibly displacing the entire population over a period of some 48 hours. The camp was a theatre of armed conflict until 2016, sustaining extreme damage in the process.

In the summer of 2017, families started to return to Ein El-Tal camp. Most of these families had been displaced to a government collective shelter in Aleppo city. As of the end of 2018, there are 90 Palestine refugee families that have returned. The camp is almost completely destroyed and lacks basic infrastructure including water, sewage and electricity.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/10787

Works have been in progress to repair water pumps in Handarat camp for Palestinian refugees, in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo.

Local residents told AGPS that equipment, including power generators, has been installed as part of underway efforts to rehabilitate the infrastructure. 

Water pumps feeding the main tank will be reportedly operative in the next few days.

Palestinian refugees have been grappling with dire conditions in Handarat due to the lack of humanitarian assistance and life-saving services. The majority of families have been taking shelter in buildings rented at extremely steep costs in the poverty-stricken area. A severe water and power crisis also continues to rock the camp.

Heavy shelling on Handarat and bloody shootouts between the government forces and the opposition outfits led to the destruction of over 90% of buildings in the camp. The confrontations culminated in the government’s takeover of the camp along with other zones in Aleppo and the displacement of its residents on April 27, 2013.

UN data indicates that Handarat camp (also known as Ein El-Tal camp) is on a hillside 13km north-east of the city of Aleppo in the Syrian Arab Republic. The camp was established in 1962 on an area of 0.16 square kilometers. Most of the inhabitants are refugees who fled from northern Palestine.

Ein El Tal camp was once home to around 7,000 residents. Around three hundred families moved to newly constructed houses in Ein El-Tal from Neirab camp under a 2003 project to reduce overcrowding in Neirab.

In April 2013, armed groups entered Ein El-Tal camp, forcibly displacing the entire population over a period of some 48 hours. The camp was a theatre of armed conflict until 2016, sustaining extreme damage in the process.

In the summer of 2017, families started to return to Ein El-Tal camp. Most of these families had been displaced to a government collective shelter in Aleppo city. As of the end of 2018, there are 90 Palestine refugee families that have returned. The camp is almost completely destroyed and lacks basic infrastructure including water, sewage and electricity.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/10787