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Residents of Handarat Camp Enduring Protracted Displacement

Published : 29-04-2021

Residents of Handarat Camp Enduring Protracted Displacement

Ten years into the Syrian conflict, Palestinian refugees displaced from Handarat Camp, in Aleppo, to Latakia city have been confronted with increased hardship due to protracted displacement and the loss of livelihoods.

Some eight years ago, precisely on April 27, 2013, Palestinian refugee families fled the camp in mass due to deadly shelling. They sought refuge in university dormitories and government shelters in and around Aleppo. Scores of other families risked their lives onboard Europe-bound “death-boats”. 

The situation is made worse by the socio-economic fallouts of the coronavirus pandemic and the price leap.

Dozens of families displaced from Handarat Camp continue to call on UNRWA, the Syrian authorities, and international humanitarian organizations to facilitate their return to the camp and work on reconstructing destroyed houses and vital facilities.

Heavy shelling on Handarat and bloody shootouts between the government forces and the opposition outfits led to the destruction of over 90% of buildings in the camp. The confrontations culminated in the government’s takeover of the camp along with other areas in Aleppo and the displacement of its residents on April 27, 2013.

UN data indicates that Handarat camp (also known as Ein El-Tal camp) is on a hillside 13km north-east of the city of Aleppo in the Syrian Arab Republic. The camp was established in 1962 on an area of 0.16 square kilometers. Most of the inhabitants are refugees who fled from northern Palestine.

Ein El Tal camp was once home to around 7,000 residents. Around three hundred families moved to newly constructed houses in Ein El-Tal from Neirab camp under a 2003 project to reduce overcrowding in Neirab.

In April 2013, armed groups entered Ein El-Tal camp, forcibly displacing the entire population over a period of some 48 hours. The camp was a theatre of armed conflict until 2016, sustaining extreme damage in the process.

In the summer of 2017, families started to return to Ein El-Tal camp. Most of these families had been displaced to a government collective shelter in Aleppo city. As of the end of 2018, there are 90 Palestine refugee families that have returned. The camp is almost completely destroyed and lacks basic infrastructure including water, sewage and electricity.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/11650

Ten years into the Syrian conflict, Palestinian refugees displaced from Handarat Camp, in Aleppo, to Latakia city have been confronted with increased hardship due to protracted displacement and the loss of livelihoods.

Some eight years ago, precisely on April 27, 2013, Palestinian refugee families fled the camp in mass due to deadly shelling. They sought refuge in university dormitories and government shelters in and around Aleppo. Scores of other families risked their lives onboard Europe-bound “death-boats”. 

The situation is made worse by the socio-economic fallouts of the coronavirus pandemic and the price leap.

Dozens of families displaced from Handarat Camp continue to call on UNRWA, the Syrian authorities, and international humanitarian organizations to facilitate their return to the camp and work on reconstructing destroyed houses and vital facilities.

Heavy shelling on Handarat and bloody shootouts between the government forces and the opposition outfits led to the destruction of over 90% of buildings in the camp. The confrontations culminated in the government’s takeover of the camp along with other areas in Aleppo and the displacement of its residents on April 27, 2013.

UN data indicates that Handarat camp (also known as Ein El-Tal camp) is on a hillside 13km north-east of the city of Aleppo in the Syrian Arab Republic. The camp was established in 1962 on an area of 0.16 square kilometers. Most of the inhabitants are refugees who fled from northern Palestine.

Ein El Tal camp was once home to around 7,000 residents. Around three hundred families moved to newly constructed houses in Ein El-Tal from Neirab camp under a 2003 project to reduce overcrowding in Neirab.

In April 2013, armed groups entered Ein El-Tal camp, forcibly displacing the entire population over a period of some 48 hours. The camp was a theatre of armed conflict until 2016, sustaining extreme damage in the process.

In the summer of 2017, families started to return to Ein El-Tal camp. Most of these families had been displaced to a government collective shelter in Aleppo city. As of the end of 2018, there are 90 Palestine refugee families that have returned. The camp is almost completely destroyed and lacks basic infrastructure including water, sewage and electricity.

 

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/11650