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Palestinians of Syria Enduring Multiple Hardships

Published : 02-11-2021

Palestinians of Syria Enduring Multiple Hardships

Eleven years after demonstrations started in Syria, the majority of Palestinian refugees sheltered in the war-torn country have been grappling with an abject humanitarian situation.

Prices have skyrocketed at the local market, where vital products have been sold at exorbitant costs. At the same time, long queues are spotted daily outside of local bakeries as members of extended families continue to line up for bread.

Scores of Palestinian refugees have been deprived of vital items distributed via smart cards used by the Syrian government to ration bread and a wider range of subsidized goods, namely fuel, rice, tea, and sugar.

UN data indicates that over half of the Palestine refugees in the country have been displaced at least once because of the brutal conflict that ensued, including 120,000 who have sought safety in neighbouring countries, mainly Lebanon and Jordan, and beyond.

Once a vibrant community of over 550,000 people, Palestinians had come to Syria in two main waves in 1948 and 1967 to settle in 12 camps across the country. Yarmouk, the most famous of the Palestine refugee camps, became known as “the capital of Palestine refugees.”

438,000 Palestine refugees remain in the country – 91 per cent of whom live in absolute poverty - and who have been among those worst affected by the conflict.

Since the start of the conflict, many UNRWA installations inside Syria, such as schools and health centers, have become inaccessible or sustained severe damage. Forty per cent of UNRWA classrooms have been lost and almost 25 per cent of the Agency’s health centres are currently unusable due to the conflict. UNRWA in Syria has also lost 19 staff members during the 10-year conflict.

PRS continue to launch cries for help over their deteriorating humanitarian condition due to the sharp decrease in the exchange rate of the Syrian pound compared to the USD and their lack of access to the local labor market. The price leap has also overburdened the cash-stripped refugees. House rents have also seen a striking hike from previous years. 

Over 80% of PRS live in extreme poverty and rely on humanitarian assistance as their main source of income. 86% of PRS households are reported to be in debt.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/12399

Eleven years after demonstrations started in Syria, the majority of Palestinian refugees sheltered in the war-torn country have been grappling with an abject humanitarian situation.

Prices have skyrocketed at the local market, where vital products have been sold at exorbitant costs. At the same time, long queues are spotted daily outside of local bakeries as members of extended families continue to line up for bread.

Scores of Palestinian refugees have been deprived of vital items distributed via smart cards used by the Syrian government to ration bread and a wider range of subsidized goods, namely fuel, rice, tea, and sugar.

UN data indicates that over half of the Palestine refugees in the country have been displaced at least once because of the brutal conflict that ensued, including 120,000 who have sought safety in neighbouring countries, mainly Lebanon and Jordan, and beyond.

Once a vibrant community of over 550,000 people, Palestinians had come to Syria in two main waves in 1948 and 1967 to settle in 12 camps across the country. Yarmouk, the most famous of the Palestine refugee camps, became known as “the capital of Palestine refugees.”

438,000 Palestine refugees remain in the country – 91 per cent of whom live in absolute poverty - and who have been among those worst affected by the conflict.

Since the start of the conflict, many UNRWA installations inside Syria, such as schools and health centers, have become inaccessible or sustained severe damage. Forty per cent of UNRWA classrooms have been lost and almost 25 per cent of the Agency’s health centres are currently unusable due to the conflict. UNRWA in Syria has also lost 19 staff members during the 10-year conflict.

PRS continue to launch cries for help over their deteriorating humanitarian condition due to the sharp decrease in the exchange rate of the Syrian pound compared to the USD and their lack of access to the local labor market. The price leap has also overburdened the cash-stripped refugees. House rents have also seen a striking hike from previous years. 

Over 80% of PRS live in extreme poverty and rely on humanitarian assistance as their main source of income. 86% of PRS households are reported to be in debt.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/12399