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AGPS highlights the education sector situations in Khan Dannoun Camp.

Published : 15-02-2016

AGPS highlights the education sector situations in Khan Dannoun Camp.

Residents of Khan Dannoun Camp complain of the crowded school classes in the camp, as schools now unable to fully meet the students' educational needs due to this issue.

The number of studying hours was reduced to three hours a day, in which the student takes his entire curriculum, while schools hosts three studying- periods per day, causing great pressure on parents and students.

Parents of the students said “the GAPAR and the UNRWA should expand schools or allocate new buildings, and provide additional staff for the students to complete their lessons".

The illiteracy rate in the camp in the seventies and eighties, was around 50 to 60 per cent, dropped in the nineties to 12%, in 2013 the percentage of illiteracy was 6% only.

The literacy rate in Khan Dannoun camp now is about 80%. Holders of university degrees from the camp work as teachers in the neighboring villages of the camp.

Nevertheless, in the education sector, there are considerable fears of the students' dropout, females in particular, because of the continuing war since 2011 and its impacts on the economic conditions in a camp where large number of women and youth have to work to help their families.

On the other hand, and because of its geographical location, the regime's army tightens its security grip on the camp's entrances and exits, puts checkpoints on the main gate, using the camps' streets as a way for its military vehicles heading to battlefronts in the neighboring villages.

The residents of the camp complain of a living crises such as food shortages, widespread unemployment, poverty, and the continuation of power outages, water and communications outage for long periods of time.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/2826

Residents of Khan Dannoun Camp complain of the crowded school classes in the camp, as schools now unable to fully meet the students' educational needs due to this issue.

The number of studying hours was reduced to three hours a day, in which the student takes his entire curriculum, while schools hosts three studying- periods per day, causing great pressure on parents and students.

Parents of the students said “the GAPAR and the UNRWA should expand schools or allocate new buildings, and provide additional staff for the students to complete their lessons".

The illiteracy rate in the camp in the seventies and eighties, was around 50 to 60 per cent, dropped in the nineties to 12%, in 2013 the percentage of illiteracy was 6% only.

The literacy rate in Khan Dannoun camp now is about 80%. Holders of university degrees from the camp work as teachers in the neighboring villages of the camp.

Nevertheless, in the education sector, there are considerable fears of the students' dropout, females in particular, because of the continuing war since 2011 and its impacts on the economic conditions in a camp where large number of women and youth have to work to help their families.

On the other hand, and because of its geographical location, the regime's army tightens its security grip on the camp's entrances and exits, puts checkpoints on the main gate, using the camps' streets as a way for its military vehicles heading to battlefronts in the neighboring villages.

The residents of the camp complain of a living crises such as food shortages, widespread unemployment, poverty, and the continuation of power outages, water and communications outage for long periods of time.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/2826