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Proven Ownership Set as Precondition for Return of Displaced Families to Yarmouk Camp

Published : 06-09-2019

Proven Ownership Set as Precondition for Return of Displaced Families to Yarmouk Camp

Member of Damascus Executive Office, Samir Jazaerli, said families wishing to return to their habitable home in Yarmouk Camp will only be allowed in if they prove ownership of the property.

A committee from Damascus toured local neighborhoods in and around the city, including Yarmouk Camp, and took down notes of the needed facilities.

A Palestinian child was pronounced dead on Wednesday after a cluster grenade exploded in Aleppo’s Handarat refugee camp.

Speaking with Syrian news outlets, AlJazerli said that a study has been underway to set practical solutions for rehabilitating the camp, adding that three reconstruction visions will be put forth in the next few days. Yarmouk Camp, which falls within the administrative map run by Damascus governorate, covers 220 hectares.

The official also said buildings built without permits and which were destroyed in the warfare will not be reconstructed. Legal and habitable buildings will be handed over to their owners following meticulous inspection, in line with Law No. 10.

According to AlJazerli, buildings located between AlBatikha neighborhood and Street 30, down to the old cemetery sustained damage of up to 90% due to their proximity to flashpoints. As for the damage wrought on the infrastructure, power and telecommunications network sustained a damage of up to 95%. A damage of 30% was reportedly inflicted on water and sanitation networks.

The residents also have retrieved water supplies in the camp after water wells in Street 30 and AlFija water lines were repaired.

A few months earlier, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) published the results of an assessment of the damage to Syrian cities caused by seven years of relentless bombardment by the incumbent regime and its allies since 2011.

The analysis found out that as many as 5,489 buildings were destroyed in Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian refugees. The damage atlas used satellite-detected damage analysis to identify buildings that are either destroyed, or severely or moderately damaged. 

Most of Palestinian families taking shelter south of Damascus fled Yarmouk as a result of the tough blockade imposed by the government troops and also after ISIS grabbed hold of the camp on April 1, 2015.

Scores of other stranded families fled the camp following the 33-day military operation launched by the government forces on April 19, 2018. The Syrian government regained control over the camp and southern Damascus towns following the military operation. Dozens of civilians were killed and dozens more injured in the offensive. Over 80% of buildings have gone either totally or partially destroyed.

A number of activists and residents attempting to reach their homes in Yarmouk have been denied access into the area by Syrian government troops deployed at the main entrances to the camp. Reports of theft have also emerged after Syrian government forces grabbed hold of the camp and burglarized civilian homes. Pro-government troops stole electric kit, furniture, and wares, among other equipment.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/9061

Member of Damascus Executive Office, Samir Jazaerli, said families wishing to return to their habitable home in Yarmouk Camp will only be allowed in if they prove ownership of the property.

A committee from Damascus toured local neighborhoods in and around the city, including Yarmouk Camp, and took down notes of the needed facilities.

A Palestinian child was pronounced dead on Wednesday after a cluster grenade exploded in Aleppo’s Handarat refugee camp.

Speaking with Syrian news outlets, AlJazerli said that a study has been underway to set practical solutions for rehabilitating the camp, adding that three reconstruction visions will be put forth in the next few days. Yarmouk Camp, which falls within the administrative map run by Damascus governorate, covers 220 hectares.

The official also said buildings built without permits and which were destroyed in the warfare will not be reconstructed. Legal and habitable buildings will be handed over to their owners following meticulous inspection, in line with Law No. 10.

According to AlJazerli, buildings located between AlBatikha neighborhood and Street 30, down to the old cemetery sustained damage of up to 90% due to their proximity to flashpoints. As for the damage wrought on the infrastructure, power and telecommunications network sustained a damage of up to 95%. A damage of 30% was reportedly inflicted on water and sanitation networks.

The residents also have retrieved water supplies in the camp after water wells in Street 30 and AlFija water lines were repaired.

A few months earlier, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) published the results of an assessment of the damage to Syrian cities caused by seven years of relentless bombardment by the incumbent regime and its allies since 2011.

The analysis found out that as many as 5,489 buildings were destroyed in Yarmouk Camp for Palestinian refugees. The damage atlas used satellite-detected damage analysis to identify buildings that are either destroyed, or severely or moderately damaged. 

Most of Palestinian families taking shelter south of Damascus fled Yarmouk as a result of the tough blockade imposed by the government troops and also after ISIS grabbed hold of the camp on April 1, 2015.

Scores of other stranded families fled the camp following the 33-day military operation launched by the government forces on April 19, 2018. The Syrian government regained control over the camp and southern Damascus towns following the military operation. Dozens of civilians were killed and dozens more injured in the offensive. Over 80% of buildings have gone either totally or partially destroyed.

A number of activists and residents attempting to reach their homes in Yarmouk have been denied access into the area by Syrian government troops deployed at the main entrances to the camp. Reports of theft have also emerged after Syrian government forces grabbed hold of the camp and burglarized civilian homes. Pro-government troops stole electric kit, furniture, and wares, among other equipment.

Short URL : https://www.actionpal.org.uk/en/post/9061